Posts Tagged With: winter checklist

Seasons Change and So Should Your Filters

Seasons Change and So Should Your FiltersBefore settling in for a long winter, consider improving your home’s air and water quality by changing the filters throughout the house. A study by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says the average person spends nearly 87% of their life indoors and that the air inside our homes is often worse than the air outside. We are exposed to higher concentrations of airborne pollutants including cold and flu viruses in our home than anywhere else.

Harmful Allergens Lurk in Your Household Dust

Household dust can contain everything from lead and formaldehyde to allergens like dust mites, pollen, mold and pet dander. Children and the elderly are especially sensitive to poor indoor air quality, which is why keeping filters clean is so important.

Here are 9 filters you should check and/or change before cold weather arrives: 

  • Furnace – Proper filter replacement can help keep it working properly. When removing a filter on an old system, note the direction it was installed. Some only work when placed with the airflow going one way.
  • HVAC – Central air and heat systems need to have the filters changed every 3 months and if you have pets, every 2 months.
  • Dryer – Clean the filter after every load. Once a year have the hose running from the dryer to the exterior wall vacuumed to prevent buildup and fire hazards.
  • Humidifier – Some heating systems have them attached so you may want a professional to service them. For free-standing humidifiers, frequently clean the unit and replace the filter to avoid mold and bacteria growing. A healthy humidity level in a home is between 30-50%.
  • HRV (Heat Recovery Ventilation) – Newer, energy efficient homes have air exchange systems that use warm indoor air to heat fresh colder air. Since contaminants can be recirculated back into the home keeping the filter changed is key.
  • AC Housing – The grill on an outdoor unit serves to keep air flowing inward and heat dissipating. Keeping it free of leaves and debris allows your system to run smoothly.
  • Water Filters – Water purifying systems have a sensor to tell you when the filter needs to be changed but we often ignore it. Change this twice a year to keep mold and bacteria from building up.
  • Refrigerator Water/Ice Maker – Just like the purifying system on the kitchen sink, the water filter on the refrigerator gets overlooked until the ice or water develops an odor or tastes bad. Letting your filter go too long can result in costly repairs or replacement.
  • Range Hood – Made of stainless steel, these filters collect grease and food particles from cooking. Scrubbing with warm soapy water and baking soda routinely will keep grime from building up on your fan motor.

Clogged filters can cause:

  • appliances to operate inefficiently.
  • AC cooling coils to freeze from lack of airflow.
  • heating and cooling costs to rise.
  • unhealthy air to be re-circulated throughout home.
  • HVAC systems to fail resulting in costly repairs.

Breathe Easier by Replacing Your Filters

By replacing your air and water filters, your home will be healthier and operating at maximum efficiency. Set a reminder on your phone to help you keep track of when to change them out. Remember to date the new filters before installing. Don’t let replacing an inexpensive filter cost you hundreds of dollars in repairs. Change is a good thing.

Expert Advice

From dehumidifiers and air scrubbers to ladders and vacuums, our expert staff is always on hand to help you keep your home comfortable and safe. Want to stay warm this Winter? Our blog, Need Hot Water/ Heat – Best Practices for Maintaining Your Systems, has tips for helping you stay toasty when cold weather arrives. As always, if you have any questions about pricing or how-to’s, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

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Categories: DIY Projects, How-To's, Restore and Renovate | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Protect Your Home from Disaster: Inspect and Repair Pipes, Ducts and Vents

3 In-Home Repairs[Restore & Renovate] This is the first installment of an informative series on making structural repairs to your home.

Right about now, you may be thinking more about checking into a nice resort for a long weekend getaway rather than checking up on all the pipes and duct work in your house. But, in the middle of this stormy winter, it’s a good idea to take a look before you go, so the house is in perfect working order upon your return!

Pipes and ducts are your home’s veins and arteries, allowing water and air to flow where they’re needed, nourishing its life-space. With the extreme winter weather Central Indiana is experiencing, a DIY homeowner doesn’t want to take any chances with frozen water pipes that could burst, or energy-depleting leaks in furnace duct work or dryer vents so full of lint; they could start a fire. Below are a few ways to alleviate the stress, so your home can relax.

FROZEN WATER PIPES

The moment you notice that a water pipe is frozen, try to unfreeze it using a heat gun. If you turn on a faucet and nothing comes out, it’s an indication to act quickly. No matter what the pipes are made from, PVC plastic or copper – both kinds can freeze:

  • Where they’re not insulated
  • If located along an outside wall
  • Underneath a cabinet usually kept closed

What to Do:

  1. Locate the freeze. Feel along the pipe for cold spots.
  2. Open the hot water side of the faucet, if the hot water line is frozen, and vice versa. Opening the offending faucet can help to alleviate pressure in the line.
  3. Move the heat gun steadily along the pipe. Depending on where the frozen pipe is located, a hair dryer or a heater positioned closely can also do the trick.
  4. Leave the faucet open for several minutes when water begins to run again, to clear away any ice. Turn the water off and inspect for damage or leaks.
  5. In the case of a leak or burst pipe, shut the water off at the main valve.
  6. Patch the leak or hole, then replace the pipe.

Protect Your Pipes

  • Let Faucets Drip – before temps drop low, open faucets of pipes prone to freezing enough to let water drip slowly. The continuous flow is the best prevention.
  • Insulate – water pipe insulation is inexpensive and readily available at your local hardware or at your local home supply center. The round lengths can be cut to size and slipped over a pipe using a slit along one side.
  • Install Heat Tape – considerably more expensive than insulation, heat tape is wrapped around exposed pipes and plugged into a household outlet. Follow manufacturer’s instructions.

FURNACE DUCT REPAIRS

The furnace, the thermostat and the duct system – together, they deliver heat throughout your house, so you want them working at peak efficiency. Age and unnoticed damage can cause any one of these workhorses to stumble. You’ll most likely need to crawl under the house, but it will be worth it.

What to Do:

1. Conduct an inspection, either by yourself, or hire a licensed HVAC contractor to do it for you. Turn the furnace on, so air can move through the ducts, making it easier to hear and feel any leaks. Bring a powerful, cordless light and follow each duct passage from the furnace to its end. Mark any areas needing repair with flagging tape, so you can find them easily later on.

  1. Look and feel for loose joints, gaps in fittings or duct boots.
  2. Note where support straps are missing or sagging, which impede airflow.
  3. Find areas where insulation is missing and where the ducts are resting directly on the ground, which can also cause moisture-related problems.
  4. Inspect the large sheet-metal box attached to the top or bottom of the furnace where the ducts originate, called the plenum. Make sure it’s fully insulated and all ducts are well sealed at the connection points.

2. Make repairs. A basic repair kit includes a hammer, tin snips, utility knife, cordless drill, some short sheet-metal screws, a roll of metallic foil duct repair tape and duct strapping.

  1. Repair loose joints in solid sheet metal ducting using sheet-metal screws, then seal with foil tape. Flexible ducts typically use a clamp system to secure joints. Sometimes the original clamp can be reused; otherwise, use a large worm-drive or flexible plastic clamp to secure, re-wrap insulation and seal.
  2. Attach duck strapping to a solid support using nails or screws, and secure the ducts up off the ground.

3. Insulate the ducts using R-8 or R-11 insulation – in cold climates as well as warm, so heated and air-conditioned air is not lost.

DRYER VENT CLEANING

While you keep up with your family’s endless laundry, lint keeps building up in your dryer and venting. Just cleaning out the lint filter before every load simply isn’t enough to alleviate this condition, dangerous enough to start a fire, or worse. Experts say a full load of wet clothes contains about a half gallon of water. Lint is created from the clothes as water is removed during the drying process. This lint builds up deep down inside the lint filter trap and all along the dryer vent hose. Warning signs of danger include:

  • Clothes take longer and longer to dry
  • Clothes don’t fully dry
  • Clothes are hotter than normal at the end of the drying cycle
  • The dryer exterior gets very hot
  • Low exhaust velocity is apparent outside at the exhaust vent flapper
  • The laundry room gets very humid or a burnt smell is evident

What to Do:

The best defense is a good cleaning of the entire dryer/vent hose/venting system, and for this you may want to purchase a special dryer duct cleaning kit, which includes a set of brushes made especially for this type of cleaning. However, a good vacuum and attachments, along with some cleaning brushes can work in a pinch. Try using a long handle 20″ gong brush or long handled scrub brush.

  1. Unplug the dryer and pull it away from the wall.
  2. Remove the lint trap filter, remove the screen by pulling it straight out and clean it gently with a fine bristled brush.
  3. Vacuum the lint trap-housing cavity, where the filter goes. Extend a brush with a long flexible handle all the way into the bottom of the cavity. Then, twisting gently, pull out the brush with the clumps of lint. Repeat until no more lint is revealed.
  4. Disconnect sections of dryer vent and remove lint build-up on the sides with a stiff brush at the end of an extender using circular motion. Repeat on all vent sections, until they are free of lint.
  5. Reassemble dryer ducting, plug in the dryer, move it back in place and replace the lint trap filter.

Good luck with all your DIY in-home repairs – you’ll be glad you took the time! And as always, if you have questions or comments please utilize our section below or the contact us page on our website.

About the Author

Jack Runyon is the president of Runyon Equipment Rental. He has 21 years of rental experience, as the 3rd generation son to carry on the family tradition and his grandfather’s vision. He prides the company for its devotion to ethics, quality products and customer service. Jack is known for his passion and vast expertise.

Categories: How-To's, Restore and Renovate | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Fix Winter Damage to Shingles Now and Avoid Costly Repairs in the Spring

How is your roof holding up during this crazy winter season? Especially in colder climates like ours, roof damage can occur easily from stormy weather and extreme temperature changes. Your shingles are going to take the brunt of wind, snow, ice, even rain – sometimes, all in one day! So don’t wait until you see water stains inside on the living room ceiling before you investigate if your roof is safe, sound and stress-free. When you know what certain weather conditions can cause, you can determine what preventative measures or repairs you may need to get done, and pronto. This means you can improve your property in the spring, instead of spending time and money on costly repairs that are too far gone for DIY repair. Below are three major causes of roof damage and the steps you can take now to prevent extensive issues.

Clear Your Roof of Snow1. Extremely Heavy Snowfall.  Piling snow adds extra weight on the roof structure, and too much weight can cause the roof to sag, leak or worse.

  1. Choose the next good-weather day and clear snow from the roof. Bundle up, use a ladder to climb up and brush snow away with a broom or shovel. Like any debris, snow tends to collect in crevices and places where melting moisture can break down the shingles, or prevent water from flowing off the roof and into the gutter system.
  2. Check for leaks that may have already formed. Common places where roof leaks can start include flashing, chimneys and skylights. It’s also a good idea to check for moisture seepage inside, at the attic level.

Clear the Ice Off Your Roof2. Ice Buildup. Fluctuating temperatures can cause heavy ice on the roof to melt, re-freeze and accumulate, causing ice dams that prevent snow melt and water from draining down the gutters properly. This can result in shingle damage and more leaks.

  1. Break up ice dams with an ice pick or a shovel. Just as you would with snow, clear the roof of ice thoroughly. Applying ice melt can help.
  2. Clear the gutter system of ice too, making sure the entire system is in good condition and drains are unobstructed.
  3. Consider having the attic properly insulated and vented so heat from your home cannot escape through the roof, keeping it at a temperature that avoids conditions where ice damming occurs. Learn more about attic insulation here.

How to Repair Wind Shingle Damage3. Wind Storms. Relentless wind can cause shingles to crack, bruise, blister or simply blow away.

  1. Fix shingle damage immediately with the right tools. You’ll need new shingles, shingle nails, a hammer, a pry bar or shingle remover and protection for your hands and face.
  2. Loosen and pry away the remainder of a damaged shingle, including the nails (which may need to be cut with a hacksaw or utility knife). Fit and hammer a new shingle in place. Learn more about shingle replacement and repair here.

Good luck with all your DIY roof endeavors – you’ll be glad you took the time! And as always, if you have questions or comments please utilize our section below or the contact us page on our website.

About the Author

Jack Runyon is the president of Runyon Equipment Rental. He has 21 years of rental experience, as the 3rd generation son to carry on the family tradition and his grandfather’s vision. He prides the company for its devotion to ethics, quality products and customer service. Jack is known for his passion and vast expertise.

Categories: Choosing Equipment, How-To's, Restore and Renovate | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Give New Life to Your Walls with a Quick and Easy Paint Job

Prep Your Wall for PaintNothing helps to improve or even maintain the appearance of a room like paint. A fresh coat of paint can transform the entire look of your living space, or just cover up eye sores, like nail holes and wear marks from shelves, picture hangings or absent light fixtures. It can also add value to your property.

For do-it-yourselfers, there’s almost nothing better to master than prepping for a paint job like a pro. Investing a little time in prep work can make painting faster, easier and more beautiful. So roll up your sleeves and find out how to avoid roller marks and spatters, and give new life to old walls.

Here’s What You Do:

  1. Remove all artwork, shelving, fixtures, nails, screw anchors, curtain rods, switch-plates, closet doors and whatnot from the wall surface – anything that can create obstacles for your paintbrush, roller or paint sprayer.
  2. To remove wallpaper easily and completely, use a wallpaper steamer.
  3. Decorative stickers, vinyl words or wall art is usually removable. Use an electric heat gun to gently lift them from the wall. Some brands can be re-applied; however, many designs that use intricate graphics may be ruined by the removal process.
  4. Spackle any nail holes, gouges or other imperfections that could rough up a smooth paint finish.
  5. Hand-sand small rough spots with sandpaper. For larger rough areas, try an electric sander.
  6. Once the walls are bare, clean them with a damp sponge or a dry cloth to remove grease build-up, dust and the like. Dirt and grime on the wall will keep paint from bonding, causing streaks and bubbles.
  7. Mask around windows, door frames, molding, built-ins and baseboards using blue painter’s tape. If you have a decorative design in mind for your paint job, blue painter’s tape is just the tool to use to map out the design on the wall. Tape out your design after you apply primer, if you use that step.
  8. Cover the floor and any furniture remaining in the room with drop cloth.
  9. Apply a primer to any sanded areas, especially larger ones, or simply prime the entire wall. Use a good-quality paintbrush to paint around windows and doors or for any finish work. Many paint brands now offer interior paint that includes a primer, which eliminates the need for a primer step. Either way, accomplish painting the larger areas quickly using a paint sprayer. To accommodate the room height, add a paint sprayer extension pole.
  10. If a second coat of paint is required, apply after the first coat has dried.

Give New Life to Your Walls

Now that your room has a fresh coat of paint, consider adding other decorative elements like crown molding to complete the new look. And for more on how to effectively paint your walls, read this post: Painting Walls in Your Dream Home Made Easy. If you have questions please contact us, and be sure to comment below if you have any of your own painting tips!

About the Author

Heidi Hudnall is the current Marketing Coordinator at Runyon Companies. She graduated from Butler University in the spring with a double major in International Business and Marketing, a minor in Spanish, departmental honors distinction and cum laude. She specializes in all things internet marketing, with an emphasis on content creation, website maintenance, blogging, social media, lead tracking and marketing strategy.

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Make Doors Look New Again with 2 Fast and Easy In-Home Repairs

There’s no better time like the present to roll up your sleeves and find out how you can complete home improvement projects and repairs yourself. All you need is a plan and the right tools for each job. Besides taking care of nagging repairs like a leaky faucet, you’ll increase the beauty of your home with fast and easy in-home repairs, like refurbishing your doors.

Repair Your Doors

1. Refurbishing Interior Doors

Interior doors are usually made from wood and can be susceptible to seasonal changes in climate, which can cause squeaks or sticking. They also can be scratched from usual wear and tear.

What to Do:

  • Inspect the hinges for deterioration or loose screws.
  • If hinges look oxidized, add a lubricant to alleviate squeaks; work the lubricant into the hinge by opening and closing the door after application.
  • If the hinges are caked with old lubricant or dirt, tap out the pins with a hammer and screwdriver and clean with steel wool, then clean the pinholes with a small circular wire brush. Remember to place a shim under the door for support.
  • If screws are loose, place a wedge on the latch-end of the door for weight balance before tightening with a screwdriver.
  • If a door continues to stick, use a planer to scrape a small layer of wood off the offending edge:
    • Draw a line on the door at the spot where it’s hitting the jamb
    • If that spot is at the top or on the handle end, you can plane the door without taking it off its hinges. If the tight spot is on the hinge end or at the bottom, take the door off its hinges and set it on its side to plane.
    • Inspect the door surface for scratches.
    • Fill any scratches with door filler, such as a pencil, crayon or felt-tip pen-type product found at many local hardware stores. Find the shade that most closely matches your door and rub it into the scratch.

2. Restore a Front Door

Exterior doors are made from wood or metal and are usually exposed to the elements. After years of wind, sun, heat and precipitation, your front door and all its hardware may need an upgrade.

What to Do:

  • Inspect the door, hinges and hardware for damage, wear and tear.
  • If repair is required, take the door off its hinges and remove the hardware.
  • Place the door on saw horses and lay down drop cloths.
  • Strip off old paint. While latex paint may need a chemical paint stripper for this job (work outdoors or make sure you work indoors with adequate ventilation), most paint can be removed using putty knives, paint scrapers, sandpaper and a hand-held sander or belt sander.
  • If you want to finish the door as natural wood, remove all the paint, sand thoroughly and apply a natural product like mineral oil. If you’re re-painting the door, sand roughly until the door is smooth and ready for paint, removing all dust from the surface.

Be sure to stay tuned for two more posts similar to this one, part of our 3-part in-home repair series! And for questions or comments concerning this post, contact us or use the comment section below. Happy door maintaining!

About the Author

Tempe Thompson is a sales and inventory expert at Runyon Equipment Rental. She has over 35 years of experience and has accumulated a tremendous amount of knowledge and expertise. She could talk for hours about how to use all of Runyon’s tools and equipment, in addition to suggesting which type corresponds to a certain application.

Categories: How-To's, Restore and Renovate | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Keep Your Outdoor Pathways Safe and Slip-Free with Ice Melt

Salt SpreadingWith freezing temperatures, inevitably your sidewalks, porch and outdoor steps are bound to be slippery and icy. However, a simple and inexpensive solution for ensuring your outdoor walkways are safe comes in an easy-to-carry bag. Ice melt is an obvious choice for preventing slips and falls during this rough winter season. Read on to learn more about its advantages and how to best use it.

Our list of essentials will help every homeowner survive the season with success:

  1. Portable Power Generator
  2. Snow Blower
  3. Outdoor & Indoor Heaters
  4. Ice Melt

In this post, we’ll explore the benefits of using ice melt.

Ouch! Winter weather hazards such as icy, snowy steps, sidewalks and driveways can make it almost impossible to walk around outside without slips and falls. That’s where ice melt can help. Deicers attract offending moisture, forming a briny substance that melts faster than the surrounding ice and snow, thereby clearing potentially dangerous walking conditions with ease.

Traditional ice melts are made from rock salt, and start to melt ice at about 5°F. Many of the new-fangled ice melts actually blend rock salt with other chemicals, lowering melt temps to the max, and work even better than traditional rock salt in extreme conditions.

Tips for Using Ice Melt

CENTRAL SALT MEGAMELT ProSlicer1. Choose Effectively: Save time and money while reducing environmental impact by choosing the right ice melt for the job. Ice melts are made from a blend of materials such as calcium chloride, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride and urea. Each works best in different temperatures. When temps drop below 5°F, ice melts that contain calcium chloride are best for clearing thick ice and snow quickly. In winter conditions above 5°F, choose a melt that contains an ingredient like urea or potassium, which get the job done effectively. Not to mention, they are safer for people, plants and pets. If you’re worried about the effects ice melt could have on your pets, choose one that is free of chlorides.

2. Apply Early: Before snow and ice accumulates, prevent them from bonding with the pavement, by making it easier to remove. Use ice melt for a major weather event, but also for light snowfalls, which can cause slippery conditions especially if the moisture re-freezes later in the day.

3. Use Wisely: Use ice melts only on properly formulated, cured, air-entrained concrete that is at least one year old. Brick and other materials are porous and should not be treated with ice melt. Less is usually more when it comes to applying ice melt, because using too much can burn the grass under the snow, or get tracked into the house, potentially damaging rugs and floors.  Follow manufacturer recommendations on quantities and application.

Once you know which ice melt to buy and how to use it, you’ll be all set for whatever this chilly winter has in store. For more information about the various types available, pricing, or any other questions, as always feel free to contact us or write a comment in the section below. Stay safe out there!

About the Author

Tempe Thompson is a sales and inventory expert at Runyon Equipment Rental. She has over 35 years of experience and has accumulated a tremendous amount of knowledge and expertise. She could talk for hours about how to use all of Runyon’s tools and equipment, in addition to suggesting which type corresponds to a certain application.

Categories: Choosing Equipment, Featured Products | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Stay Warm this Winter with Heaters Just Right for Your Home

Space HeaterWith the bone chilling temperatures this year, it isn’t a bad idea to think about investing in one, or even a few, portable heaters for indoor and outdoor use. If the power goes out, or with the wind chill well below freezing, an energy-saving and cost-effective way to ensure heat for you and your family is with portable heaters. Read on for more benefits of portable heaters and other essentials this winter season.

Here’s our short list of essentials every homeowner can use to survive the winter season with success:

  1. Portable Power Generator
  2. Snow Blower
  3. Outdoor and Indoor Heaters
  4. Ice Melt

In this post, we’ll explore the benefits of using portable heaters.

Maybe this is the year you’ll host that fabulous tailgate you’ve always wanted on Super Bowl Sunday – outside, right in the driveway! Or perhaps you really want to fix that old sports car you’ve got in the garage, only you think it’s too cold to work out there in winter. Either way, portable space heaters can keep you warm and comfortable, inside and out.

Inside, portable heaters can warm an un-heated room, one that’s not used often or a place where the main heating system needs extra help. In addition, you may save money on your energy bills with zone heating, an alternative to central heating. Instead of heating your whole house, heat only the rooms you spend time in. Space heaters are perfect for this type of heating because they’re portable, they’re generally efficient to run, they’re eco-friendly and they can keep you comfortable.

Patio HeaterOutside, there’s no reason to freeze your fingers and toes on a cold winter day. Portable heaters can be placed on a patio, a deck or a driveway to heat just that small area you’re using, like zone heating in a house. It’s a great way to get the party started!

Outdoor and indoor heaters run on electricity, propane, natural gas or kerosene, and work by circulating the air in a room (convection) or by using radiant heat, which warms things directly in its path. Newer models have all of the current safety features, including the Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) label. Choosing a heater with a thermostat allows you to control the heat and avoid wasting energy. Some heaters come with a tip-over safety switch, which automatically shuts off the heater if the unit is tipped over.

First, determine the size of the space that needs to be heated and whether or not you want to warm a personal space or the entire area:

  • Radiant heaters are good choice to heat a room or space for a few hours, and you stay within sight of the heater.
  • Convection heaters that use a heat transfer liquid are ideal for warming a personal space or small room, under desks in the office or in a bedroom. They use no fan, so they’re relatively silent. They’re also easy to maintain because the liquid inside never needs to be replaced.
  • Ceramic heaters use fan-forced air, are compact and good for heating spaces up to 150 square feet, like living rooms or bedrooms.
  • Infrared heaters produce heat quickly, are also quiet and very efficient for warming personal spaces.

Then, once you’ve decided which heater/s you need for your home, you know just where to find them. We carry a wide variety with many of these specifications, find them here. Also, if you have any questions about what to choose, pricing, etc., don’t hesitate to contact us.

About the Author

Jack Runyon is the president of Runyon Equipment Rental. He has 21 years of rental experience, as the 3rd generation son to carry on the family tradition and his grandfather’s vision. He prides the company for its devotion to ethics, quality products and customer service. Jack is known for his passion and vast expertise.

Categories: Choosing Equipment, Featured Products | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

[INFOGRAPHIC] 8 Simple Home Winterization Tips

The majority of your outdoor equipment winterization should be done already, but now is the perfect time to begin home winterization. Below are eight relatively simple tips for sufficiently preparing your home for all that winter has in store! You’ll find what each task entails and then the tools needed to complete them – some require very little, which make for quick and easy projects. And this may be a no-brainer, but completing all these to-do’s will prepare your home for ice, snow, sleet and whatever else weather may bring. You’ll be glad you put in the extra elbow grease. Happy winterizing!

Winterization Tips

About the Author

Heidi Hudnall is the current Marketing Coordinator at Runyon Companies. She graduated from Butler University in the spring with a double major in International Business and Marketing, a minor in Spanish, departmental honors distinction and cum laude. She specializes in all things internet marketing, with an emphasis on content creation, website maintenance, blogging, social media, lead tracking and marketing strategy.

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