Posts Tagged With: Safety

Safely Operate Scissor & Boom Lifts in 5 Simple Steps

How-To Safely Operate A LiftNeed to climb to high heights and get a chore done on your property, or perhaps shoot a movie (it’s been known to happen)? Well, there’s a lift for that! Lifts are specialized machines that help you safely access work areas that are located high above ground level, and are hard to reach with a ladder. In the case of a movie shoot, a lift can put you and the camera up high for panoramic views of a set or outdoor vista.

A scissor lift uses a single crisscrossed metal arm mechanism that moves straight up by electricity or hydraulics, delivering a smooth ride to the elevated work area. A boom lift has articulated joints and extendable metal arms usually fixed to a 360-degree rotation turntable that swings them full circle for quick and flexible positioning, above obstacles or other areas that are not safe for a standard scissor lift.

Whether you rent a scissor lift or a boom lift, it’s important to follow standard safety procedures when operating either one.

Step 1. Inspect the equipment before operation. Check the platform floor, guardrails, toe boards, tires, wheels, basket, hydraulic hoses and fittings for fluid leaks. Test the ground controls, manual lowering controls, platform controls and emergency stops, making sure that every function of the lift works correctly, including steering and drive functions.

Step 2. Check the work site at ground level for uneven surfaces, drop-offs or holes, bumps, floor obstructions or debris and overhead hazards, making sure the lift is not parked on a slope that exceeds operator manual specifications. Make sure you’re not going to exceed the maximum lift capacity of the machine.

Step 3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment, such as a safety harness and any protective equipment specific to the lift you’re using, such as a fall arrest lanyard with a boom lift. Load your equipment into the basket.

Step 4. Turn on the engine and run through all of the lift operations, including raising, lowering, extending, retracting and/or basket tilting. Move the lift forward and reverse, then move it into place. Make sure it is stable. Set any safety outriggers, if equipped.

Step 5. Lift the work basket or adjust the height and angle of each boom arm to reach your work area. After work is completed, take care to shut down the lift, leaving all arms in locked positions.

Expert Advice

JLG and Genie Scissor Lifts and Boom Lifts are available for rental. Most are appropriate for both indoor and outdoor applications and are reliable and energy-efficient, offering the maximum job productivity. Some run quieter and cleaner, while others fit through most standard doorways and tight aisles, perfect for areas with limited access and maneuvering in tight workspaces. If you have any questions about what to choose, pricing or how-tos, don’t hesitate to contact us. Our expert staff is always on hand to help you with surface preparation projects. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

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7 Best Practices for Keeping Your Work Site Safe

7 Job Site Safety Best PracticesWhether you’re preparing for a heavy construction job or a home yard project, one of the most important tasks you have in front of you is making sure that the work environment is safe. This includes the work site itself, the surrounding area and your workers. Even with safety precautions fully in place, people can still get injured, but dangerous work zone conditions, putting the public at risk and injuries are less likely if you follow these seven best practices.

  1. Walk through your work site to identify any situations that could be considered unsafe, writing down the details and potential solutions. Bring this list with you to your rental supply company – the folks there should be able to help you alleviate workplace hazards.
  1. Identify any potentially hazardous chemicals or materials at the work site. Label and store these materials in proper containers, placing them in a safe location. Include a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) and post handling precautions close by.
  2. Inspect all tools and equipment, including those that are rented, making sure they are working properly. Do not operate any faulty machinery until repairs are made.
  1. Train all personnel, not only in operating procedures, but work site safety. Include proper lifting techniques, specific tool operation, how to get on and off machinery, where to get rid of rubbish or demo materials, etc.
  1. Every worker needs to be using personal protective equipment such as hard hats, safety goggles, work boots and gloves, earplugs, face masks and other forms of protection. Workers should use harnesses and other safety equipment for roof work or working on scaffolds.
  1. Prepare for emergencies. All site workers should know what to do in case of injuries, electrical, mechanical or power failures and potentially dangerous weather.
  1. Protect the public during working hours from the rigors of heavy construction or worksite dangers with barricades such as construction signs, construction cones, safety barricades, crowd control fences or flashing safety lights. Site workers should direct traffic using standardized stop signs. After hours, protect ongoing work areas or holes with street plates and lock down all entrances to the work zone.

One regulatory note: Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act), employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthful workplace, including keeping it free of serious recognized hazards. If you own a company or are in business for yourself, it is your responsibility to comply with and enforce all Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards. Follow all recommendations and mandates from occupational health and safety inspectors. OSHA’s Law and Regulations are easily accessible online.

Categories: Choosing Equipment, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

4 Smart Guidelines for Hanging Christmas Lights Safely

Decorating your home and yard for the holidays is a festive neighborhood tradition that brings out the designer in all of us. In communities all over the country, so many families vie for “Best Holiday Lights Display” that they’re competing in a national competition on television. That’s right – just this week, ABC premiered a new series called The Great Christmas Light Fight, the first Christmas lights competition of its kind where 20 families transform their homes for the holidays and compete for a total of $250,000 in prizes. Holy Clark Griswold! The show airs through December 23, and will probably give you some fantastic ideas for decorating your own extravaganza.

Christmas Lights

Before you’re ready to flip the switch on your Christmas lights though, here are a few guidelines to help you work smart and stay safe:

  1. Create a Master Design. Break out the camera, some paper and pencil, and get to work. Taking a photograph of your yard from an appropriate distance can keep you focused on the overall look of the display. Choosing a focal point to anchor your design, whether it’s a unique architectural feature of the home or a winding path or the intricate branch patterns of a tree, and start designing from there. Consider including the backyard in your design this year, which you can also enjoy from inside your home. Use a tape measure to determine how many light strands you need, as well as, the distance to the power source. Experts recommend 100 lights for every 1-1/2 feet of tree or shrub you want to cover. The denser the lights, the brighter they shine, so look for light kits where the bulbs are spaced close together, or place two sets of lights side-by-side for the same effect. Choreograph your design using different colored lights to highlight different areas and have fun with the many types of lights available, such as icicles, blinking, LED, light nets and more.
  2. Safety First. This is a big one. Check the roof, shingles, gutters and other surfaces you’ll hang lights on for strength and flexibility. Decorate trees that do not touch power lines. Work with another person, and secure supplies to the ladder safely. Use UL approved extension cords and light kits for outdoor use, and follow manufacturer recommendations on the number of lights you can string together safely. Do not use lights that have frayed or damages cords, and test all lights before you hang them. Choose plastic light clips to easily secure lighting to gutters and other surfaces.
  3. Set a Timer. To save on energy bills, use an outdoor timer to turn lights off later in the evening. These days, timers also come with sensors that automatically turn on at dusk –especially nice when you’re away from home.
  4. Plan the Power Source. In addition to creating a master lighting design, planning the best way to access power for your display is key for safety. Experts suggest that outdoor lights be plugged into circuits protected by ground fault interrupters (GFCIs) that protect against shock. Power stakes are portable and bring the power to where you need it, instead of running too many extension cords all over the place.

If you rent a generator, be sure to follow all manufacturer safety instructions, such as operating it outside, because carbon monoxide exhaust fumes can be fatal. Protect it from rain, snow and wind with a cover made from plywood and 2x4s. Follow state, local and national fire and electric codes and do not connect the generator directly into your home’s main fuse box or circuit panel because it might feed into the electric system and endanger any utility workers in the area. Check County noise ordinances if the generator is noisy, or choose one that’s quiet. Turn off the generator when away from home and while you sleep.

About the Author

Tempe Thompson is a sales and inventory expert at Runyon Equipment Rental. She has over 35 years of experience and has accumulated a tremendous amount of knowledge and expertise. She could talk for hours about how to use all of Runyon’s tools and equipment, in addition to suggesting which type corresponds to a certain application.

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