Posts Tagged With: outdoor to-dos

Protect Your Trees: Learn How & When to Prune

How and When to Prune Your TreesTrees add beauty, interest and much needed shade to your yard. Replacing trees is a big investment, which is why properly pruning and maintaining them is essential. Not sure what kind of trees you have?

Who You Gonna Call? An Arborist, Of Course

An arborist is professionally trained in identifying the species and determining the health of individual trees, in the name of safety -for the trees and for your family. They can diagnose diseases, insect problems and soil health. Consult an arborist to find out what trees are best for your landscape and where to plant them. Many are certified by the International Society of Arboriculture.

5 Reasons to Prune a Tree

  1. To remove dead or diseased branches
  2. To thin the crown, permit new growth and promote better air circulation
  3. To reduce tree height
  4. To remove obstructing lower branches
  5. To shape a tree for aesthetic purposes

There’s a Right Time to Prune Your Trees

Prune your trees during their dormant season (late fall, early winter) to minimize sap loss and stress to the tree. This will reduce the risk of fungus infection and insect infestation.

Helpful Tips on Pruning

  • Know what kind of trees you have – some flowering trees like to issue buds on old growth in the winter and then bloom in early spring. If you prune one of these trees in the winter, you may not have any blossoms come spring.
  • Avoid pruning a newly planted tree – give it time to establish.
  • Prune when the leaves have fallen – it makes it easier to see what needs to be cut.
  • Never cut more than 25% off of your tree at one time.
  • Don’t trim branches near electrical lines – call a professional or the power company.
  • Never cut the top off a tree – this can cause the tree to die. Thin branches out instead. If it is too tall, consider removing the tree completely.

Tree Surgery is … Surgery

Always use clean, sharp tools for pruning; you wouldn’t want anyone cutting on you with a dull blade, right? When removing diseased branches, wipe your cutters with disinfecting wipes between each cut. This will keep disease from spreading as you cut other branches. You can also use a solution of 1-part bleach to 9-parts water and dip the cutters in as you work.

Handy Tools for Pruning

  • Anvil hand pruners – for small branches up to a ½-inch in diameter.
  • Long-handled loppers – for medium sized branches up to 2.5 inches in diameter.
  • Pruning saw – for larger branches, use a pole extender to reach the higher branches.

Where to Cut and Why

If you would like a detailed how-to on pruning techniques, read our blog, Getting Ready for Fall Part 1: Tree Trimming a Seasonal Sport or visit the Arbor Day Foundation’s webpage for more information.

Let a Professional Handle the Tough Stuff

There are times when every DIY’er needs to step back and let a professional take over. If the limbs you want to cut down require the use of a chain saw and a ladder, then maybe this is one of those times. There’s no shame in playing it safe! 

Take Care of Your Trees

Trees are the crowning glory of any yard, so take care of them. At the end of a long day of pruning, sit down in the shade of your trees, relax and remember the words of John Muir (father of our National Parks): Allow nature’s peace to flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.

Congratulations! Another job well done. Now, go hug a tree!

Expert Advice

From tree pruners and chain saws to wood chippers and wheelbarrows our expert staff is always on hand to help with your next DIY gardening project. As always, if you have any questions about pricing or how-to’s, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

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Categories: Fall Checklist, Featured Products, Gardening and Lawn Care, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

6 Easy Steps for Installing a Hammock

hammock

Dreaming of tropical vacations? Those lazy warm weather days don’t have to be a figment of your imagination any longer. Install a hammock in your backyard and get ready to relax.

Tropical Splendor in Your Own Backyard

Custom hammocks like the ones made at Pawleys Island Hammock Shop on Pawleys Island, South Carolina conjure images of white sandy beaches and fruity drinks sporting umbrellas. Capture the feel of the tropics right in your own backyard by installing one of these lazy day body slings. No matter which hammock you choose, it’s a simple weekend project with big benefits.

Hammocks Like Peace and Quiet

If you don’t have two trees close enough to hang a hammock, then you will need to install a couple of support posts. To help select a good spot, ask yourself a few questions:

  • What type soil do I have? – The firmer the better to properly install the posts. (You don’t want the leaning tower of Pisa experience when you get in the hammock)
  • How deep of a hole can I dig? – If the ground is full of tree roots or rocks, you might collapse from exhaustion before you dig deep enough to properly plant the posts. Or, you’ll need special equipment.
  • Do I really need that shade? – Some trees drop lots of leaves so you may not want your spot directly under a tree.
  • Where is the most relaxing location? – Avoid the tendency to put the hammock next to a pool or other gathering spots. Look for a secluded area.

Once you’ve found the perfect spot, here is what you will need:

  • (2) pressure treated 4×4 posts
  • Shovel
  • Post hole digger or an auger attachment
  • Drill
  • Level
  • Screw driver
  • Bag of quick set concrete
  • Gravel

Place Post Holes Properly

Measure the hammock lying flat from ring to ring, then add an additional 24 inches. This will tell you how far apart to position the posts. Dig the holes 8-12 inches in diameter and at least 24 inches deep (30 inches if your soil is sandy or loose).

Hammock Hardware First

Putting the hardware on first before planting the posts in the ground is much easier. Decide how high off the ground you’d like your hammock. Installation instructions should have precise measurements on where to place the hardware. Measuring down from the top of the posts, drill holes and install the hook screws by hand (tighten with a screw driver inserted through the eye to give a better grip).

Now you are ready to install the posts:

  1. Pour 6 inches of gravel in the bottom of each hole.
  2. Mix up your bag of quick set concrete.
  3. Place a post in each hole with hardware facing the opposite pole.
  4. Use a level to make sure the posts are plumb.
  5. Pour the concrete around each post and allow 24 hours to dry.
  6. Attach the hammock to hook screws.

A New Hammock Adds to the Perfect Backyard Oasis

Warmer weather is almost here, and now you are ready for it. Clip in your hammock, close your eyes, picture a peaceful island oasis, and let the rocking lull you to sleep. Sometimes the simplest breaks are the best vacations. Yard work can wait another day!

Expert Advice

From augers and shovels to concrete mixers and drills, our expert staff is always on hand to help you find the right equipment for your next DIY backyard project. Want to create an even more elaborate backyard retreat? Find your Zen by adding a soothing water feature. Our blog, How to Build a Backyard Pond in 10 Simple Steps may inspire you. As always, if you have any questions about what to choose, pricing or how-to’s, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

Categories: DIY Projects, How-To's | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Getting Ready for Fall Part 1: Tree Trimming – A Seasonal Sport

Prepare for Fall - Tree Trimming

Lying in your lawn chair, you look up and realize, “Man, my trees need a little shaping up.” Before you end your relaxation and start cutting away at your trees, take a deep breath. As with all things, timing is important. We have the how, when and whys of tree trimming to help you plan for the months ahead.

Why trim a tree?

  • To promote plant health – cut dead or diseased branches keeps it from spreading
  • To maintain a plant’s shape for landscaping purposes – like hedges or topiaries
  • To improve a plant’s appearance – control the plant’s size, shape and thickness
  • To protect people or property – remove branches that fall and injure people or property
  • To improve security around a property – remove unwanted growth blocking the view of entries or windows

Keep Your Trees Healthy and Looking Great

A little year-round maintenance (light shaping) is fine to keep your trees healthy and looking great. If you want to really prune a tree back, be sure to do it at the appropriate time during their yearly growth cycle. This way, you can encourage the plant to grow fuller and produce more flowers and fruit. An arborist can help you make the right decision on which branches to cut and which to save.

Trimming Promotes New Growth in Spring

So when is the best time to trim a tree? Winter months are when the tree is dormant. Pruning during this time will promote a generous burst of new growth come spring. Just wait until the coldest weather has passed and you should be fine.

Corrective Pruning

If you want to do some corrective pruning to a tree then do this in the summer months. By cutting a tree limb back during the summer part of their growth cycle, you are helping to slow the development of new branches. This is the time to take out low lying limbs so they will not readily return.

Fall – Enjoy Football Instead

Wait until after the fall to do any tree trimming. Because fungi spread their spores profusely during the fall, cutting a tree limb in the fall will make them susceptible to these diseases. Trees also heal slower during these months. Enjoy some football and wait.

Save Major Pruning for Winter

Winter is the time when you should do the most drastic trimming if needed. It is when you should cut branches that overhang your home or fence. The best rules of thumb are the 1/4 and 1/3 rules:

  • Never remove more than 1/4 of the tree’s crown in a season
  • Don’t prune more than 1/3 of the way up from the bottom on deciduous trees

Trimming Flowering Trees

For flowering trees, if they bloom in the spring then you should prune them after they finish blooming. If they bloom mid to late summer then trim them back in the winter or early spring. This will help you avoid trimming off any buds that the tree is forming for next year.

Use Sharp Tools

Some good tips for pruning any time of the year is to always use sharp tools. They will make cleaner cuts on the trees and will help the tree heal faster. If you have high branches use a pole pruner instead of trying to climb on a ladder. It is too easy to tip over when sawing a limb. Chain saws can help you take down many of your branches, but for large overhead branches play it safe and call in a professional. Check out our blog, How to Cut down a Tree, for more helpful suggestions on using chain saws.

Stress-Free Tree Trimming

As summer winds down, don’t stress over trimming back your trees. Make small adjustments here and there and save any major trim work for the winter months. Enjoy the dog days of summer and the wonderful shade your trees provide.

Expert Advice

Our expert staff is always on hand to help you with your yard and garden projects. From tree pruners and nippers to chain saws and wood chippers, if you have any questions about what to choose, pricing or how-to’s, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

Categories: DIY Projects, Gardening and Lawn Care, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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