Posts Tagged With: nailer

How to Create a Custom Picture Frame in 6 Simple Steps

How to Make A Custom Picture Frame

Have you ever come across an incredibly unique poster, painting or photograph that doesn’t fit into a standard frame size? If you live in Indianapolis you’ve probably seen the Neighborhoods of Indianapolis poster, which unfortunately falls into this category. Because of this, I had to find a new solution for framing mine, and since a custom frame from a craft store costs a small fortune, I decided to utilize my dad’s expert DIY ability instead.

First things first, gather the tools…

Thankfully my dad has a mecca of power tools in his shed, so he was able to come up with everything we needed. However, for those of you without an extensive tool collection, Runyon has a huge array of tools for rent and purchase. Stop in or check out our website for the full catalog of products. Here are all the tools you need (assuming you already have trim for the frame and plywood for the back frame piece):

Things to keep in mind, according to good ol’ dad…

The goal is to find a way to join the corners of the trim that will ultimately form the frame. If you want to get fancy with it you can use a router bit to form tongue and groove joints, but this is only optional. You could also consider a layered frame look, i.e. stacking trim to create a shadow box style. The key to this whole process though, is to make sure your parallel sides are exactly the same size in length and that the corners are cut to perfect 45-degree angles. Accuracy is crucial for this to work properly.

And now the steps…

  1. The first thing you have to do is measure and cut your frame sides into parallel pieces i.e. make sure parallel sides are equal in length. Also, make sure you leave enough length for the 45-degree angles in the next step.
  2. After cutting the trim pieces to the correct length, it’s time to measure and cut 45-degree angle corners. The miter saw is integral for this step because it will ensure accurate cuts. Test and fit your pieces as you go to make sure they line up with no gaps.
  3. Once all your frame pieces are the proper length and have well-fitting corners, glue and clamp the corners together for at least an hour.
  4. Then for additional stability, toe-nail the corners together with a brad gun (nailer). At this point your frame should be complete with the exception of the back piece and hanging hardware.
  5. Attach the back piece of plywood with a nail gun after ensuring it’s the correct dimensions (i.e. enough to cover the frame opening, but not too big that it overlaps outside the far frame edge).
  6. And the very last step, install hardware for hanging the frame. You can pick up brackets, a wire set, etc. from a hardware store. Just be sure whatever you buy is rated for at least the weight of your frame – for instance, mine weighs about 50 lbs.

And voila, you’re ready to hang and admire your picture for years to come! If you have any additional questions about this process or the tools used, please don’t hesitate to comment below or contact us. Happy DIY-ing!

Categories: DIY Projects, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spring Refresh DIY Idea #1 – Building a Better Chicken Coop

How to Build a Chicken Coop

More and more people want to raise chickens. This trend isn’t just in rural areas but in urban ones, too. Folks want to get back to a more organic way of living and eating. If you are a would-be chicken farmer, then it’s time to get your ducks (or dare we say chickens) in a row. Your first big task is to build a chicken coop.

The Scoop on Coops

You need to ask yourself a few key questions upfront to help you refine your game plan:

  • How many chickens do you want to keep? This will determine the size of your coop. A flock of at least three hens would need a 4×8 foot screened-in run as well as a 4×4 foot critter-proofed coop where hens can lay eggs.
  • Do you know where you’ll build or place your coop? You need to place it in an area where it will have adequate shade during the hot summer months and ample sunlight during the cold winter months. Near a tree that drops its leaves in fall is perfect.
  • Do you want to build a coop from scratch or do you want to repurpose an existing building? Recycling an existing structure will save you money but it will still need to be altered to meet the needs of the flock. If you build one from scratch, you may want to purchase detailed chicken coop design plans that will take you through the project step by step. There are plenty of “free” plans out there; just remember – you get what you pay for!

Now that you have determined the size, placement and construction design of your coop, you are ready to begin. Here are a few tips to keep in mind.

  • Raise it up – Make sure the floors of the nesting area are raised to help keep chicken feet dry during rainy weather. Galoshes are not an option for these “kids.”
  • Let there be light – Egg production is affected by the amount of light the flock is exposed to. This is why production is down during winter months. To counter this, install a light inside the coop. Use a warm light source and not a blue/white one.
  • Feather that nest – Give the flock warm places to nest. One idea is to use a plastic storage bin with the lid on it. Cut a hole in one end for the chicken to enter through and a second hole on the back so you can reach in for the eggs. Be sure to line the inside of the bin with hay for warmth. The plastic bin makes it easy to pull the nest out, clean it and return it back to the coop.
  • Keep the critters out – Raccoons and other predators are smart so protect your flock with metal latches that cannot be easily opened. Be sure to lock your coop up at night to keep them safe.
  • Free to roam (sort of) – Yes, you want chickens to have ample room to roam but you can’t watch over them all the time. Building a screened in run will keep them safe and provide you with peace of mind.
  • Can we vent? – Good air circulation is essential to keeping your flock in robust health. Place screened in gaps between the walls and the roof to allow heat to escape and air to enter without causing drafts.
  • You have to use the coop, too – Sure, the ladies are a little on the short side, but unless you want to crawl on your hands and knees to retrieve their eggs, you might want to consider your comfort in the design of the building. You will be entering it frequently to feed, water and clean.
  • Let’s decorate this hen house – You will be looking at this chicken coop for a long time so you might as well make it look nice. Consider painting the outside or adding hanging plants. Let your imagination run wild.

Once you are finished with your incredible chicken coop sit back and relax. Bask in the knowledge that your chickens are happy and living in a condo creation that you built. Just ignore the ugly stares you may be attracting are from your dog! (Note to self – next project: new dog house).

Expert Advice

Our expert staff is always on hand to help you with your DIY yard projects. From circular saws to nailers and staplers, if you have any questions about what to choose, pricing or how-to’s, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

Categories: DIY Projects, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Advanced Tutorial: How to Reupholster a Chair in 5 Steps

Reupholstered Chair (before and after)Reupholstering any piece of furniture, let alone a complex wingback chair, is not for the faint of heart. It takes a decent amount of hard work, familiarity with sewing and using power tools, an eye for detail and a precise hand. Although this particular project took several weeks to finish, the result was well worth it all. Now, there is a lot involved in reupholstering a sturdy piece of furniture on your own, so below is a loose set of steps. Also, consider the following tips before undertaking such a project, or for you ambitious DIY-ers, keep them in mind throughout the project.

Difficulty: moderate-hard

Necessary Tools and Supplies:

  1. Fabric (this project took about 6 yards)
  2. Sewing machine and thread
  3. Pliers and/or flathead (for prying up staples)
  4. Scissors
  5. Fabric marker
  6. Staple gun
  7. Nailer
  8. Screwdriver

Reupholster Your Chair in 5 Steps:

1. Prep Work: First things first, you have to take off the chair legs (unscrew with a screwdriver). Then you must begin taking staples out of all the fabric. This may seem simple (I certainly thought it would be), but be prepared for a lot of prying — having the right tools really makes a difference here. I used a pair of pliers and a flathead screwdriver for popping out the staples.

Now, be sure as you take each piece of fabric off that you label which part of the chair it came from so you don’t mix them all up. Then once all the upholstery has been removed from your chair, you can start tracing and marking the old fabric pieces onto the new fabric, again being sure to mark which piece goes where.

2. Sew Back Together: Next, you have to sew together your new fabric pieces (based on which of the old pieces were sewn together…be sure you make note of this too). Again, this was a process, and it took really careful detail, being sure to cut and sew very close to the original fabric.

This chair had piping as well, so I also had to sew the piping and then sew each between the two respective pieces they went between. The cushion cover was crucial in this step because I had to make sure it fit correctly. And keep in mind, it is much easier to make a piece smaller than to try and make it bigger.

3. Assemble It All: After the upholstery is sewn and categorized by where it goes, you can begin placing each piece onto the chair form. My suggestion is to begin placing each piece in the same order with which you removed each piece. So, the first piece I took off on the old chair was the bottom side panels, so I put those back on first, then worked my way up. Again, this will be as complicated or as simple as the original chair, ottoman, couch, etc. that you choose. I also chose to add tufts, so this was something I made sure to place before stapling anything down.

4. Secure Down with Staples: After each panel is in place, you can begin stapling them in an organized order. For this chair, the back panel and the bottom panel were the last to go on. Keep in mind, you want the fabric secured well, not too tight, but also not too loose. If worse comes to worse, you can always take staples out and re-do them. However, this would be arduous and counterproductive, so be sure the fabric is placed well before pulling the trigger.

5. Final Touches: The last step is to put your legs back on the bottom and the cushion back in the seat. Then, as long as everything looks clean and crisp, you’re done!

Resources and Help:

This was definitely the down-and-dirty version of reupholstering, not as specific as a post explicitly for reupholstering a wingback chair. That said, if you would like a resource for step-by-step pictures and nitty-gritty details, check out this blog post. It helped me a lot. Really once you start though, it all starts making sense. If you have any questions about how to reupholster, the tools to use, renting tools, specifics on my process, etc. please comment below or email me (heidi@runyoncompanies.com) Happy reupholstering!

Categories: DIY Projects, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: