Posts Tagged With: Ladder

How-To Transform Your Walls with Texture

how to give your walls textureWant to try something different to upgrade the look of your walls? Express your creative side with textured paints and techniques, and transform your space into a Tuscan villa with stucco walls or a rich marbled hall. Let the walls be your canvas and add some texture to your life.

Be Adventurous with Brushes, Sponges and Paper

Decide on the look you want and start experimenting. Ready-made products are always easy to use, but be adventurous and try brushes, sponges or tissue paper to create unique looks. Good results depend on good preparation so clean, patch and sand your walls before painting. If your walls already have texture on them, remove it before adding a new one.

4 Products That Add Texture to Walls:

  • Textured paint – Comes in grades ranging from very fine to coarse. Easy to use but may be limited in color selection.
  • Texture additives – Mix it with regular paint and adjust the amount of grit for your desired look.
  • Joint compound – Apply to a wall and then use a texturing tool to make the pattern you want. Allow it to dry completely before sanding or painting.
  • Textured wallpaper – Add this to your wall with strong adhesive, prime and paint.

A Paint Sprayer Makes Texturing a Breeze

If you decide to use a textured paint but can’t find the color you want, use it as a base coat. Apply a top coat in the color of your choice with a paint sprayer to finish off your look. Textured paint can be thick (to give you time to work with it) so allow plenty of drying time.

Spackle Your Way to a Beautiful Design

Joint compound or spackle is easy to use and slow drying, which gives you plenty of time to craft your design. Practice your texturing method first and perfect your technique. Once dry, use fine grit sandpaper to smooth out mistakes or to allow more of your base coat to come through.

Methods to Texture Walls:

  • Combing – Pull a whisk broom, thick bristled brush or a comb through the paint or compound to create ridges or patterns. Use vertical and horizontal strokes to create a woven look similar to rice paper.
  • Rag Rolling – An old rag, dipped in paint and rolled over a wall, creates a dappled effect. Add multiple layers and shades of paint for visual depth.
  • Smooshing – Apply a coat of paint, press a piece of plastic into it and then gently remove it to achieve a marbled look.
  • Sponging – Create irregular patterns by dipping a sponge (natural or synthetic) in paint and smudging walls.
  • Patterned roller – Pre-cut rollers make tackling larger areas easier and help keep patterns uniform. Try dipping one end in one color and the other in a second color for a unique look.
  • Wood grain tool – Pull through wet paint to simulate the layered look of wood.
  • Venetian plaster paint – A two-toned paint process that gives the look of marble or stone and lets your underlying color show through.

The Sky’s The Limit with Textured Paint

Be inventive, use different materials like cheese cloth, lace and or wadded up tissue paper to achieve interesting patterns and textures. Stencil a pattern using textured paint to give a 3D effect. There is no wrong way of texturing, so go for it! This is one DIY project where the sky is the limit, so let your creative flag fly.

Expert Advice

From ladders and paint sprayers to orbital sanders and wet/dry vacuums our expert staff is always on hand to help with your next DIY painting project. Worried about using a paint sprayer for the first time? Learn the Proper Techniques for Painting with a Paint Sprayer by reading our blog. As always, if you have any questions about pricing or how-to’s, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

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Categories: DIY Projects, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Paint It, Don’t Replace It! Tips for Painting Tile

how to paint tileUgly, outdated tile is something many DIY homeowners want to fix. Replacing it is always an option, although this may be the costlier expense. You won’t have to live with it any longer, however. Paint it, don’t replace it! While not a permanent fix, painting your tile can freshen the look of a room and give you more time to make future renovations.

Preparation and Product Selection Are Key

The keys to successfully painting tile are preparing the surface properly and using the right type of paint. Preparing tile is a little more involved than painting drywall but the time you spend doing it right will help the paint look better and last longer.

3 Steps to Preparing Tile for Painting:

  • Clean it – Remove all the soap scum, dirt and mildew from the tiles and grout. Use an abrasive bathroom cleaner and rinse well.
  • Sand it – Rough up the surface using a 180/220 grit sandpaper (synthetic grit paper like silicon carbide or aluminum oxide work well) to remove the gloss off of the glazed surface. An orbital sander will do this quicker and more evenly than hand sanding.
  • Dust it – Wipe the tiles down with a damp cloth to remove any loose debris or grit. It can show through the paint.

Repair Tile and Grout Before Starting

Your tile and grout need to be in good shape. Paint amplifies any imperfection so make any repairs to cracked, chipped or broken tiles before starting. Re-do your grout if it is too dry and cracking. Remove all caulk from around tubs and counters. It is best to re-apply a fresh bead when your painting is finished. Tape off all fixtures, faucets and mirrors to avoid getting paint on them.

Tips for Painting Your Tile

  • Use an epoxy bonding primer to help the paint adhere properly.
  • For the best color selection use a latex paint (semi-gloss or high gloss) and apply 2 coats.
  • A paint sprayer will give you the smoothest results.
  • If you use a sponge brush, work in one direction to minimize streaks.
  • Lightly sand in between coats to help the paint stick.
  • Finish with several coats of sealant and allow 2-3 days to dry completely.

Painted Tiles Can Last 5 Years

This easy DIY project is a great way to freshen up outdated tile until you’re ready to redecorate or renovate. Painted tiles can last up to five years if you avoid harsh cleaners or scrub brushes. Stop living with ugly tile and get out the paint sprayer. That icky avocado green is going down!

Expert Advice

Wanting to try your hand at installing tile? Our blog, How to Install a Kitchen Tile Backsplash, has some great tips to get you started. From ladders and paint sprayers to grout cutting saws and orbital sanders, our expert staff is always on hand to help with your next home DIY project. As always, if you have any questions about pricing or how-to’s, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

Categories: DIY Projects, How-To's, Restore and Renovate | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hummingbird Feeders Liven Up Your Garden

bird feeders liven up a gardenYour garden is not just a random combination of plants and flowers, but an environment for the wildlife that lives there. One of the most entertaining creatures to watch is the Hummingbird as it flits, flies and hovers in search of nectar. Adding a feeder (or two) will attract these tiny birds, providing hours of delight for you and your family.

Fascinating Facts About Hummingbirds

  • According to The Hummingbird Society, 34 of the 342 known Hummingbird species are at risk of extinction.
  • They can hover and fly backwards.
  • They lap up their food with a long thin tongue.
  • Bugs are their primary food source and sugar (that comes from natural or manmade nectar) is the fuel that energizes them.
  • They are voracious eaters, starting to feed as early as 45 minutes before sunrise and continue throughout the day.
  • They are attracted to the color red, although they have no need for red food (forget food dyes!)
  • Leaving a feeder out all year will not entice them to stay. Some birds migrate up to 3,000 miles annually. Bring your feeder in when you haven’t seen a Hummer in three to four weeks.
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are territorial so place feeders in different locations so other varieties such as Rufous, Black-chinned and Calliope will feed.

Flowers First, Feeder Next

Placing your feeder near flowering plants is the best way to attract Hummingbirds. Some of their favorite garden plants are Azaleas, Butterfly Bush, Cardinal Flower and Coral-bells; Flowering Crabtree, Fuchsias, Honeysuckle, Impatiens, Lantana and Weigela. Don’t worry if you don’t see birds while your garden is in bloom, they are too distracted by your gorgeous flowers and will return to the feeder soon.

Hummingbirds Like It Clean

As long as they are kept clean, Hummingbirds have no preference on plastic, glass or homemade feeders. Look for one with feeding ports above the liquid (dripless), that have perches and are easy to clean. Start small until you attract a steady number of birds, then add more feeders.

Fresh Food is Good

Hummingbirds actively avoid a spoiled food source, so changing your feeder every four to five days is essential. Spoiled liquid will look cloudy and may have black mold spots floating in it. Throw away old nectar rather than topping it off.

The Best Nectar Recipe

Because Hummers get their nutrients primarily from flower nectar and insects, skip buying supplemented commercial nectar. Also, avoid using honey, Jell-O, raw (turbinado) or brown sugar, fruit or red dye. Here’s the best nectar recipe:

  • Mix 1-part sugar to 4-parts water
  • Boil for 1-2 minutes
  • Cool and store in the refrigerator for up to two weeks

Prevent Feeder Mold

Use a mild detergent, bottle brush and hot water to clean your feeder before changing the food. Once a month, use a mixture of ¼ cup of bleach to a gallon of water to prevent mold. Full strength vinegar instead of bleach is also a good option, just rinse well.

Bees and Wasps Can Ruin Your Feeder

When Hummingbirds feed they often spill nectar onto surrounding surfaces, which attracts bees and wasps. To discourage them, wipe the feeder ports or dilute the sugar mixture in the nectar recipe. Moving the food source to a new location can help, too – the birds will follow it, but the bees won’t.

Sticky Situation for Ants

Nectar also attracts ants, which is why many feeders come with an ant barrier or water moat. Still, ants can be determined creatures, so try applying a very sticky goo called Tanglefoot to the bottom of the moat tray. Flip the tray upside down on the feeder to keep it out of contact with the birds.

Become a Dedicated Hummingbird Caretaker Today

These delicate aerial acrobats bring zip to your garden and are fun to watch. Become a dedicated caretaker of a Hummingbird feeder today and help save these beautiful creatures for another generation to enjoy.

Expert Advice

Our companion blog, How to Attract Birds and Butterflies for a Livelier Yard, is filled with helpful tips on how to bring more wildlife into your garden. From ladders and drills to shovels and wheel barrows, our expert staff is always on hand to help with your next gardening DIY project. As always, if you have any questions about pricing or how-to’s, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week.

Categories: DIY Projects, Gardening and Lawn Care, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

See How Easily You Can Rid Your Gutters of Dirt and Grime

Your gutters don’t clean themselves. Every time it rains or the wind starts to blow, nature deposits water, soil, leaves and who knows what else into the humble gutter system.

Gutters help prevent water and debris from damaging your house by moving them away from doors and windows, siding, the foundation and garden beds. Not to mention, they keep water and debris from getting inside your house, or eroding the groundRid Your Gutters of Dirt and Grime around it.

And the task of keeping your gutters unclogged and unfettered is entirely yours. Thankfully though, maintaining them is a relatively uncomplicated job, one that’s best done as a preventative measure. Before the weather gets worse, I would consider accomplishing this task as soon as possible, especially if you have a faulty gutter system. Doing so will ensure you have an effective gutter system for years to come.

First, climb a ladder. Your first line of defense is to climb up on your roof and take a look at the condition of your gutters, and even before that, you’ve got to get yourself a good ladder.

A ladder is a tool, and it’s important to use the right tool for the job. Select an extension step ladder that will reach the work area with a little room to spare, and be sure it is sturdy enough to hold you, your tools and other work materials without coming apart or falling to the ground.

When choosing a ladder, also take into account what the ladder is made from. For instance, metal ladders conduct electricity and can create a danger of electrocution. If the area around your work project has a lot of wires or live circuits close by, choose a ladder made from fiberglass or aluminum.

If labeled multipurpose, you can use this ladder as a step, extension, stairway or plank support ladder. Ladders can be heavy-duty or extra-heavy duty. They can also include slip-resistant rungs, pail shelves, rag racks, drill holsters and tool trays. Ladders with a platform hoist are usually used by professionals for big roof jobs.

The right ladder for the job. Other safety suggestions for working with or on a ladder:

  • Generally designed for use by one person (unless otherwise specified in duty rating)
  • Use a ladder if you are in good physical condition
  • Where possible, have a second person hold ladder in place while in use
  • Keep ladder free from dirt and slippery materials (keep your shoes clean too)
  • Always open ladder fully and lock spreaders before climbing
  • Place on firm level surface with a secure footing
  • Windy conditions require extra caution
  • Never leave a ladder set up and unattended, especially around children
  • When climbing up or down, face ladder, maintain a firm grip with both hands and keep body centered between side rails
  • Move ladder to accommodate reach
  • Avoid “walking” ladder when standing on it
  • Do not stand higher than 3 ft. from the top of the ladder
  • Do not stand, climb or sit on ladder top, pail shelf, braces or back section
  • Set ladder at proper angle by placing your toes against the bottom –
  • Stand erect – extend your arms straight out
  • When palms of your hands contact the top of the rung, which is about shoulder level, ladder is at approximately the proper angle
  • Do not place in front of door opening toward ladder

Once you’ve climbed up on a ladder and inspected your gutters, you may need a garden hose and bucket, chisel and sealant, a rivet gun and paint, rubber gloves or a pressure washer to clean and repair gutters.

Get the goop out. Clean away any leaves or debris left in the gutter and the downspouts, making sure to clear clogs that hinder proper drainage, which causes sagging gutters.

Check: Spikes, leaks, rivets. Next, check all the spikes that hold the gutter to the house, making sure they fasten securely. If not, they need to be replaced with new ones. If the gutters themselves contain holes or the seam caulking is cracked, use a chisel to scrape old caulking out. Dry the area thoroughly, then repair with a new bead of silicon sealant, roofing cement or metal-repair patch – whichever matches the gutter material. Make sure the rivets on the downspout are tight and intact, otherwise be sure and replace them.

Ooo, power tools! You can clean gutters with the old-school method of a garden hose and bucket. However, if you’ve secured your gutters with new screws or spikes – and love power tools – consider using a pressure washer. If you choose this route, follow manufacturer’s instructions specifically, setting the washer to the lowest pressure and using the appropriate water or cleaner. Take care when aiming the water stream at the gutters, so you don’t blow the roof shingles off!

Got rust? If the gutters are rusting, sand them down and paint with a good primer and a rust-inhibiting paint. Or buy a new gutter system altogether.

Not just for decoration. Installing a splash block on the ground below a downspout keeps water from digging a trench next to the house and away from the home’s foundation.

About the Author

Tempe Thompson is a sales and inventory expert at Runyon Equipment Rental. She has over 35 years of experience and has accumulated a tremendous amount of knowledge and expertise. She could talk for hours about how to use all of Runyon’s tools and equipment, in addition to suggesting which type corresponds to a certain application.

Categories: Fall Checklist, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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