Proper Techniques for Painting with a Paint Sprayer on Interior Projects

Handheld paint sprayers that use airless technology give do-it-yourself painters and painting contractors alike the ability to achieve a truly professional finish on both small jobs and touchup work with quick setup and easy cleanup. Operated by electric or battery power, handheld sprayers have a gun and pump built into the sprayer just like traditional models, with the added feature of portability.

Advantages of Airless Sprayers

Airless technology uses high pressure to force paint through a small nozzle or spray tip, creating a fast-moving, fine spray of liquid that atomizes or reacts with the outside air, breaking into small droplets that form a consistent spray pattern. The size of the spray tip determines the flow pressure and fan pattern. Designed for indoor and outdoor use, handheld airless paint sprayers are easy and economical, four times faster than brushing and at least two times faster than rolling. Paint, as well as a variety other coating materials from stains to heavy latex and acrylics, can be sprayed on all types of surfaces, resulting in a uniform, even finish.

About Paint Spray Guns

In addition to paint sprayers, paint spray guns also make quick work of painting. Some models of spray guns use innovative technology like intuitive spray gun controls, quick release fluid set, optimized air pressure and air flow, and different rotating positions to cover completely.

Proper Spray Techniques

  1. Achieve good spray pattern. Spray at the lowest pressure that completely atomizes the paint. Start at the lowest setting, adjusting slowly upward until the spray pattern shows no fingers or tails. Test the spray pattern on scraps of cardboard or other waste material. If the maximum sprayer pressure still isn’t enough, change out the spray tip for one with a smaller opening.
  1. Get a good aim. Position the paint sprayer about 12 inches from the surface and aim the spray straight at the surface. Move the paint sprayer across the surface with the wrist flexed, keeping the sprayer pointed straight at the surface. Avoid directly the paint spray at an angle, which will cause an uneven finish.
  1. Use a gentle trigger motion. Allow the paint sprayer to start moving in a stroking motion before triggering the paint stream during this lead stroke. Release the trigger before the end of the stroke, often called the lag stroke. Keep the paint sprayer moving throughout the paint spray to prevent too thick of a coating at the beginning and end of each stroke.
  1. Use an overlapping technique. Spray tips are designed for a 50% overlap of strokes to achieve a smooth, even amount of paint is sprayed on the surface with no visible lines in the finish. Spray the outside edges of ceilings or bare walls first before continuing to the middle of the surface.
  1. Painting corners. Aim the paint sprayer directly into the corner and spray along it rather than using a back and forth motion.

Beginner Mistakes

Two things beginner airless paint sprayers users should avoid are 1) Spraying at too high of a pressure and 2) Misfiring the trigger at the start and stop of each stroke

Expert Advice

Our expert staff is always on hand to help you with interior paint projects. We carry top-of-the-line Graco handheld airless paint sprayers. If you have any questions about what to choose, pricing or how-tos, don’t hesitate to contact us. Stop by our store — we’re open seven days a week. For more on paint sprayer techniques, read our blog, The Airless Sprayer: A Hidden Gem for All Your Painting Applications.

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Categories: Choosing Equipment, Featured Products, How-To's | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Proper Techniques for Painting with a Paint Sprayer on Interior Projects

  1. Pingback: Paint Like a Pro – Tips for Painting Your Ceilings and Walls | Runyon Equipment Rental Blog

  2. Pingback: How-To Transform Your Walls with Texture | Runyon Equipment Rental Blog

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